May 28, 2018 colored candles

Candle coloring information

ElfyShop includes color suggestions for each of our fragrances under the description area of each fragrance. Please read below all the information about candle colorings. These could be useful if you are going to make your own candles or if you just want to understand better candle coloring.

Coloring Blocks

Candle coloring blocks are available in red, coral/peach, yellow, blue, green, purple, burgundy, brown, teal, cinnamon, and cranberry. One block is enough color to deeply dye nearly 7kg of wax. Each block is between 1/2 ounce and 1 ounce each. These coloring blocks can be used in candles only. NEVER use these coloring blocks in cosmetic products! It is also important to know that they do not produce as vibrant colors as our liquid candle dye or powdered candle dye. They may produce specks of color on the bottom of your candles. When you are at the point to color your candles you have to make sure your coloring blocks are fully before pouring into your candle wax. Using too much color in your candles may clog your wick, create more smoking, may reduce the melt pool of your candle, and may inhibit scent throw.

Spectrum Liquid Candle Dyes

Please note that these candle dyes are very concentrated! If you are doing small batches or you desire to achieve pastel colors, you will need to dilute your spectrum dye with vegetable oil before adding to the wax. To avoid a slightly chemical smelled candle, do not use more than 10 drops of liquid candle dye per half a kilo of wax. It is also not usable in cosmetic products. Please do not forget that! Using too much color in your candles may clog your wick, create more smoking, may reduce the melt pool of your candle, and may inhibit scent throw. Using liquid candle dye will allow you to create candles that have consistent coloring each time because you can simply count the number of drops you add to your wax.

Powdered Candle Dyes

The most concentrated form of Candle dye! But these colors can be easily mixed to create any color in the rainbow and more. Because it is concentrated use them in a very small amount of rich coloring results. For better dispersion, melt in stearic acid first before adding to your wax. Also not usable in cosmetic products and using too much color in your candles may clog your wick, create more smoking, may reduce the melt pool of your candle, and may inhibit scent throw.

How to Mix Your Own Colors

Blue –  A primary color, you cannot mix this one.
Yellow – A primary color, you cannot mix this one.
Red – A primary color, you cannot mix this one.
Black –  You cannot make black.  To get a black candle, use black liquid candle dyes or black powered candle dyes.
White –  Add no color
Orange –  Mix yellow and red to your specifications
Pink – Simply use red, but in small quantities in your candles
Ivory –  Use a small amount of brown in your candles.
Burgundy – Use mostly red and add a small amount of black
Brown –  A mix of yellow, blue, and red
Plum – A mix of red and blue to your specifications
Purple – A mix of red and blue
Teal –  A mix of blue with a little yellow
Green – A mix of yellow and blue
Cinnamon –  A mix of brown with a little red added
Sage – Green with a little brown added to it
Navy Blue –  Blue with a little black added to it
Fushia –  Red with a little blue added to it
Peach –  Simply use a small amount of orange
Hunter Green –  Green with a little black added to it

Burnt Orange –  Orange with a little brown added to it

We hope this information was helpful to you. Let us know about your favorite candle coloring products or technique! Can’t wait to discover something new every day.

 

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